From the setting of the sun to its rising…

…”the name of the Lord is to be praised!” Psalm 113:3

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Okay, I know I got my settings and risings mixed up but that’s because we found extra opportunity this week to praise the name of the Lord during the night. So instead of giving you a sunset (or sunrise) of the week picture, you’re getting a slide show (compliments of NASA) of some images from within Cygnus, the Swan constellation. We’re spending a lot of time looking at Cygnus the next couple weeks because we are participating in the Great World Wide Star Count. This means making a report on the number of stars we can see within the Cygnus constellation on any given night between October 5 and 19. You can participate in the star count too, by clicking on the following link:starcount

Also, congratulations to Titus and Joel who can now identify 8 of these constellations by sight in the night sky! A quarter of the way toward our goal!

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Friday’s Factoid 2 (by Titus and Joel)


This week we got to see the International Space Station fly over Hawaii. I saw it first coming over the ocean. It looked just a like a big, bright star moving really fast (Joel).

The Space Station is flying over 17,000 miles per hour and is about 220 miles above the earth. It is as big as a football field. 6 astronauts are there right now but 3 will be coming back to Earth on Sunday (Titus). 
You can learn more about the ISS by clicking on this NASA video link
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Teacher’s Two Cents (by mom)

So was it worth getting the whole family up before dawn and wandering groggily out onto the golf course to get a clear view of this man-made object? I say, “definitely yes” and the boys all agree. They loved the adventure of it but I’m just a big fan of anything that helps put what we’re learning into a solid context. The Germans make a distinction between Kennenlernen and Wissenschaft. The latter follows the usual method of gathering facts about a particular subject while the former involves using whatever means possible to really get to know that subject like you would another person. So we got to get to know the ISS a little better this week and had a grand adventure to boot!

God and the Astronomers


I just finished a great book by Robert Jastrow (1925-2008), the founder and former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute and a self-avowed agnostic. In “God and the Astronomers,” Jastrow describes the scientific discoveries and the men who made them leading up to the development of the Big Bang theory. What was surprising was how begrudgingly scientists like Albert Einstein came to embrace this theory because it pointed to a single beginning of the cosmos. Jastrow finds the reactions of others in the scientific community fascinating because of the emotional ring to them.

He suggests that “…scientists cannot bear the thought of a natural phenomenon which cannot be explained.”

“There is a kind of religion in science,” Jastrow observes, and “this religious faith of the scientist is violated by the discovery that the world had a beginning under conditions in which the known laws of physics are not valid, and as a product of forces or circumstances we cannot discover. When that happens, the scientist has lost control.”

Jastrow continues, “If he really examined the implications, he would be traumatized. As usual when faced with trauma, the mind reacts by ignoring the implications –in science this is known as ‘refusing to speculate’–or trivializing the origin of the world by calling it the Big Bang, as if the Universe were a firecracker.”

Science is left with a huge problem. If they have in fact “proven that the Universe exploded into being at a certain moment,” they are now faced with the question, “What cause produced this effect?…And science cannot answer these questions…The scientist’s pursuit of the past ends in the moment of creation…[and] the barrier to further progress seems insurmountable.”

Jastrow concludes that “at this moment it seems as though science will never be able to raise the curtain on the mystery of creation. For the scientist who has lived by his faith in the power of reason, the story ends like a bad dream. He has scaled the mountains of ignorance; he is about to conquer the highest peak; as he pulls himself over the final rock, he is greeted by a band of theologians who have been sitting there for centuries.”

Just a few quotes to inspire you to pick up a great book and read it!
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Hoping for a cloudless night

Found a neat website that allows you to track the current location of the International Space Station and see what it’s view of the earth might be like.
iss.astroviewer.net
Also, you can find out when you can actually see the ISS overhead by plugging in your current location on NASA’s website.
index.html
Just go to the blue “connect to mission” box on the lower left and click the orange “station sightings” button.
There should be a 2 minute window tonight and a 4 minute window tomorrow night when we can see the ISS cross over Kona. Unfortunately we’ve had a lot of patchy clouds lately, which makes for some great sunsets, but not very good star-gazing.

Venus Transit of the Sun

At NOAA’s Venus Transit viewing site

School doesn’t start until Sep.4 but I wanted to include a field trip in this blog that we took at the beginning of the summer to the Natural Energy Lab here in Kona. On June 5 they set up a viewing station where people could safely view the transit of Venus across the face of the Sun. There were special telescopes to look through and NOAA was handing out nifty little viewing glasses which we took home to view the rest of the transit through. Seeing that tiny spec of a planet dwarfed by that huge glowing orb really helped put some perspective on our own planet’s size in relation to the sun. The next transit will be in 105 years! View NASA footage of transit here

One last look from our place